It’s 6:30 in the morning and all I can think about is what I have planned for today, tomorrow and this weekend. When did I get so busy? I’m sipping on my second cup of coffee and running through today’s agenda, which is looking pretty full. I’ll be lucky to whip up a protein smoothie in between meetings and errands.


I choose to stay busy because that’s what works for me. I’m energized by new business ventures, inspiring projects, events and of course spending time with my family and friends. However, there is something to be said for spending time by yourself. I am actually a huge advocate for this and have learned to embrace it as a result of a serious relationship ending. It is during these times you grow as a person and gain insight on becoming a better version of yourself. Sometimes you have to figure out what your alone time looks like. For some its eating by themselves or going to a movie. For me, I find that my most cherished time alone is when I travel.

It’s my thing. It includes just one bag, just one person and a itch to explore. The fact that I curate my solo adventures, stumble upon unexpected explorations and meet some pretty cool people along the way are what makes me appreciate life so much more. I have been to many places on solo adventures, both in the US and internationally. Yes, wanderlust destinations known for picturesque honeymoons and insta-worthy girls trips. Some of my best memories have been made during these times. I ate my way through France and experienced my first bomb scare there, may or may not have been on the back of a scooter driven by a sexy Italian man who (may or may not have) took me to a secluded beach where we drank wine and swam naked in the Amalfi coast, visited a orphanage in Thailand and rode on the back of an elephant through the river and a few more that I will leave for a future post.

Its during these times that I find myself and my voice as a individual. Without outside pressures you can form your own opinions and learn to embrace and appreciate the person you are before allowing others to appreciate you. Finding who you are, just you, without a title being attached to it. As author Marya Mannes says, “The greatest omission in American life is solitude; not loneliness, for this is an alienation that thrives most in the midst of crowds, but that zone of time and space free from outside pressure which is the incubator of the spirit.”

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